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Magda Marečková, Nuffield Department of Women's & Reproductive Health DPhil student, has won this year's special prize, the Special Young Scientist Award at the Fast Forward Science 2020 web-video competition. She wins for her compelling video: "Heavy periods, sharp pain and no one to listen to you? Could you have Endometriosis?".

The web-video competition Fast Forward Science is a joint project of Wissenschaft im Dialog and the Stifterverband. It has been held annually since 2013. Prizes with a total value of € 21,500 will be awarded in 2020. The partner in the VISION category and of the Young Scientist Award is the Deutscher Zukunftspreis, the German President’s Award for Innovation in Science and Technology.

Fast Forward Science encourages students, communicators, researchers, web video makers and those interested in science to submit compelling web videos on scientific topics. The challenge: The videos should be entertaining, scientifically accurate and easy to understand at the same time. The aim is to make science web videos more visible. Web videos are an excellent way to communicate about scientific topics and are suitable for reaching large audiences. By enhancing their visibility and showcasing excellence, it will encourage more people to use them to communicate science.

Magda Marečková's wining video was awarded this year's Special Young Scientist Award. It shone a spotlight on Endometriosis  - a disease that is just as common as diabetes, but hardly anyone has heard of. Is there such a thing? It's a disease that affects 190 million women worldwide. This is associated with severe pain, but so far hardly researched. In her video, she explains what it is all about, the current state of research and how endometriosis is changing the lives of those affected.

Watch Magda's winning video here

The full story is available on the Nuffield Department of Women's & Reproductive Health website

 

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