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Professor Julia Hippisley-Cox and her team in Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences have been Highly Commended in the ‘Best use of technology in Patient Safety’ category for the QCovid risk calculator at this year’s Health Service Journal Patient Safety Awards.

award with three stars

The commendation is in recognition of their work developing QCovid – an evidence-based risk-prediction model that uses a range of factors such as age, sex, ethnicity and existing medical conditions to predict risk of death or hospitalisation from COVID-19 – which ‘pushed the boundaries of patient safety and drive cultural change to minimise risk, enhance quality of care and ultimately save patient lives’ over what has been a challenging period in the history of the healthcare sector.

Following a comprehensive and thorough judging process, the QCovid team was handed the distinguished award, standing out amongst a highly competitive shortlist.  The team was recognised for their proactive, diligent hard work and the demonstrable positive impact that their project has within the health and social care sectors.

“We’re thrilled to have been Highly Commended in the best use of technology in patient safety category,” said Professor Hippisley-Cox. “It’s encouraging for all our team to have our efforts recognised by the HSJ awards programme, particularly when we think back and consider the many challenges we’ve all had to face since the dawn of COVID.”

Read the full story on the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences website

 

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