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A team of epidemiologists, mathematical modellers and economists at Oxford University has released an independent analysis of the trends in the number of coronavirus infections (incidence) on the Isle of Wight, UK before and during the first phase of the test and trace programme (TT), including the first version of the NHS contact tracing app. Results of the study, which has not yet been subject to formal peer review, can be explored on EpiNow interactive tool.

People walking outside wearing masks and using mobile phone

The results show rapidly declining total incidence, per capita incidence and reproduction number (R) levels in hospital and community tested cases on the Isle of Wight following the introduction of the TT programme on May 5, 2020. The Isle of Wight results also show a decreased R value when compared to other areas of the UK, positioned with one of the worst rates (147th out of 150 upper tier local authorities - UTLAs) just before the TT programme, and rising to one of the best R rated areas (10th out of 150) by the end of the analysis period.

The full story is available on the Big Data Institute website

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