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Six of Oxford University's distinguished scientists, and four from the Medical Sciences Division, have been elected as Fellows of the Royal Society for their outstanding contributions to science.

© OUI/Greg Smolonski

Image credit: OUI/Greg Smolonski

This year’s Fellows are:

Professor Neil Brockdorff FRS, Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford.

Professor Vincenzo Cerundolo FMedSci FRS, Director, MRC Human Immunology Unit, MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford. The award recognises Professor Cerundolo’s world leading research on T cell immunology, particularly his discoveries on how peptides and lipids are processed and presented to T cells. This research has opened new therapeutic avenues. ‘I am extremely honoured and humbled to be receiving such an important recognition,’ said Professor Cerundolo, ‘I am certain that working in the exciting and vibrant environment of the MRC WIMM and being able to collaborate with so many outstanding colleagues has contributed enormously to this achievement.’ Find out more.

Professor Andrew King FMedSci FRS, Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow and Professor of Neurophysiology, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford. Find out more.

Professor Dominic Kwiatkowski FMedSci FRS, Head of Parasites and Microbes Programme, Wellcome Sanger Institute and Professor of Genomics and Global Health, University of Oxford. Professor Kwiatkowski said: ‘I am honoured to be elected to the Fellowship of the Royal Society. It is a testimony to the amazing creativity and teamwork that is going on at Sanger and Oxford, and among all our partners in the MalariaGEN network. It is a great privilege to work with colleagues who are so committed to gaining a deep scientific understanding of malaria, not only as a fascinating biological problem, but also as a critical step in reducing the burden of disease in the poorest parts of the world.’

Professor Graham Richards CBE FRS, Chairman and Founder, Oxford Drug Design Ltd and Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford.

Professor Guy Wilkinson FRS, Professor of Physics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford.

Find out more (University of Oxford)

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