Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The Observational Health Data Sciences and Informatics (OHDSI) international community will host a COVID-19 virtual study-a-thon this week (March 26-29) to inform healthcare decision-making in response to the current global pandemic.

It is being held in lieu of the cancelled OHDSI European Symposium, which would have taken place in Oxford. Lead organiser Daniel Prieto-Alhambra, Professor of Pharmaco- and Device Epidemiology at NDORMS said: "Our organising committee was hit quite hard when we realised it would be necessary to cancel our long-awaited OHDSI European Symposium, but we quickly realised that our community could come together and make a difference in this global pandemic."

"We are using the time for a COVID-19 virtual study-a-thon that will catalyze a long journey of shared research ahead. Based on the early enthusiasm of our many registrants, I'm optimistic that we can make important progress on the journey and make a meaningful contribution to this international effort."

More than 290 people from 29 different countries have registered for the four-day online event. Alongside the Oxford team are researchers from Erasmus Medical Center, Columbia University, UCLA, Ajou University, Janssen Research and Development, and IQVIA with active participation across government, industry, and academia.

Read more on the Nuffield Department of Orthoapaedics, Rheumatology & Musculoskeletal Sciences (NDORMS) website

Similar stories

Drug could help diabetic hearts recover after heart attack - Oxford research

Researchers at the University of Oxford have identified a drug that could ultimately help improve heart function in people with diabetes who have heart attacks.

Largest ever global study of tuberculosis identifies genetic causes of drug resistance

Using cutting-edge genomic sequencing techniques, researchers at the University of Oxford have identified almost all the genomic variation that gives people resistance to 13 of the most common tuberculosis (TB) drug treatments.

Peter Horby receives prestigious award for outstanding service to public health

The Faculty of Public Health (FPH) has awarded its prestigious Alwyn Smith Prize to Professor Sir Peter Horby (Nuffield Department of Medicine) for 2020/2021 in recognition of his outstanding service to public health as a global leader in epidemic science.

Six new Fellowships announced as part of Oxford-Bristol Myers Squibb Fellowships Programme

The Oxford - Bristol Myers Squibb (BMS) Fellowships Programme continued to demonstrate significant progress over the last year, despite the challenges associated with the global pandemic, including restricted lab access and work from home guidance. Today, we are pleased to announce six new Oxford-BMS Fellowships for 2021.

Researchers set out steps to address mental health effects of the pandemic on young people

Researchers have outlined 14 steps that schools, mental health services and policymakers can take to help children and young people whose mental health has been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Anti-cancer drug derived from fungus shows promise in clinical trials

A new industry-academic partnership between the University of Oxford and biopharmaceutical company NuCana as found that chemotherapy drug NUC-7738, derived from a Himalayan fungus, has 40 times greater potency for killing cancer cells than its parent compound.