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Oxford Open Doors is an annual celebration of Oxford’s unique buildings and spaces run by the Oxford Preservation Trust as part of the Heritage open days scheme. This year, over 100 buildings are taking part in the event that runs from the 8-9th September, including several Medical Sciences Departments.

Medical Sciences at Oxford Open Doors

On Saturday 8 September, facilities at the Old Road Campus, including the Richard Doll building (housing the Nuffield Department of Population Health) and the Old Road Campus Research Building (ORCRB, housing Oncology and the Nuffield Department of Medicine units Ludwig Cancer Research, the Jenner Institute and the Structural Genomics Consortium) will be opening their doors to the public. Visitors will have the chance to learn about the medical research behind the headlines via fun family-friendly science fair activities, talks by leading academics, and tours of real scientific laboratories. In the Richard Doll building (10 am – 4 pm), topics will include statins, Million Women Study, clinical trials, diet and exercise, breastfeeding, antibiotics, cancer, heart disease and stroke.

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Activities for the day

In the ORCRB (12.30 - 3pm), visitors will explore the transmission of infectious diseases such as malaria by building a model mosquito, learn about 3D packing in protein crystals using jelly babies, understand the use of medical imaging techniques with a guess-the-fruit activity and discover the effect of DNA mutations by translating coded messages and a microscope demonstration of fluorescent fish.

The Sir William Dunn School of Pathology on Parks Road will also be opening its doors to the public, offering tours of the building and its facilities, and a talk focusing on the history of penicillin and pathology.

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