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Dr Eoghan Mulholland has received the prestigious Lee Placito Research Fellowship in Gastrointestinal Cancer. Eoghan will use this 3-year position to research cell interactions in colorectal cancers.

Eoghan Muholland

Dr Eoghan Mulholland, Postdoctoral Research Scientist in Cancer Genetics at the Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics and member of Somerville College has recently been awarded the Lee Placito Research Fellowship in Gastrointestinal Cancer.

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is currently the 2nd most common cause of cancer death in the UK. To date, research tells us that it isn’t just the genetic defects in the cancer cells that influences how a cancer behaves, but also how the supporting (stromal) and immune cells interact with it. Currently we don’t fully understand how these ‘cell conversations’ initiate and develop but using cutting-edge research methodologies we can have the opportunity to ‘eavesdrop’. Using the Lee Placito Fellowship, Dr Mulholland  will focus in on these cellular exchanges to better understand how cancer cells, stromal cells and immune cells interact with each other across both human tissue and in Genetically Engineered Mouse Models. Through better understanding of this we can then hope to influence how the cells conversation, change the CRC dynamics, and ultimately improve treatment.

On receiving this Fellowship, Dr Mulholland commented:Using the Lee Placito Fellowship, I will focus in on the ‘cell conversations’ between cancer cells, stromal cells and immune cells. Through better understanding of this we can then hope to influence how the cells communicate, change the colorectal cancer dynamics, and ultimately improve treatment.’

Find out more about the Lee Placito Research Fellowship

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