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A global review involving almost 20 million people has shown that having diabetes significantly raises the risk of developing cancer, and for women the risk is even higher.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Researchers from The George Institute for Global Health also found diabetes (type 1 and type 2) conferred an additional risk for women, compared to men, for leukaemia and cancers of the stomach, mouth and kidney, but less risk for liver cancer.

The findings published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) highlight the need for more research into the role diabetes plays in developing cancer. They also demonstrate the increasing importance of sex specific research.

Find out more (University of Oxford website)

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