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An interdisciplinary team of engineers and medics is addressing ways to increase the UK’s capacity for ventilator manufacture.

A prototype for a rapidly deployable ventilator on a wooden table

Engineers, anaesthetists and surgeons from the University of Oxford and King’s College London are building and testing prototypes that can be manufactured using techniques and tools available in well-equipped university and small and medium enterprise (SME) workshops.

The team, led by Oxford Professors Andrew Farmery, Mark Thompson and Alfonso Castrejon-Pita and King's College London’s Dr Federico Formenti, have been working to define novel mechanisms of operation that will meet the required specifications for safe and reliable function. The design aims to exploit off-the-shelf components and equipment.

Read the full story on the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences website

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