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In the race to develop a COVID-19 vaccine, a lot of attention has been paid to the types of vaccines being developed and their progress through the various stages of clinical trial.

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A lot less attention has been paid to what happens after a vaccine is approved by the regulators.

As recognised by a US scientific committee, governments need to start planning how they will distribute a vaccine efficiently and fairly, because, when a vaccine is approved, most countries won’t have enough doses to vaccinate everyone.

Read the full article on The Conversation website, written by Laurence Roope and Philip Clarke, Nuffield Department of Population Health

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