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The University of Oxford is launching a study investigating the delivery of the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 coronavirus vaccine using a nasal spray.

Close up of a spray bottle drops on black background

The Phase I trial, which will enrol 30 healthy volunteers aged 18–40, will investigate the level of immune system responses generated by the vaccine using this delivery technique, as well as monitoring safety and for any adverse reactions.

All of the volunteers will receive the same vaccine that is currently being delivered by intramuscular injection as part of the national roll out of the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine. The volunteers, who will be drawn from the local Oxford region, will be followed for a total of four months.

Dr Sandy Douglas, Clinician-Scientist and Chief Investigator of the study said:

'Some immunologists believe that delivering the vaccine to the site of infection may achieve enhanced protection, especially against transmission, and mild disease. We hope this small safety-focused study will lay the foundation for future larger studies that are needed to test whether giving the vaccine this way does protect against coronavirus infection.'

The vaccine will be delivered using an intranasal spray device, similar to many over-the-counter hay fever nasal sprays.

Read the full story on the University of Oxford website.

Learn more about the trial on the Jenner Institute website.

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