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The first awardees for the University of Oxford’s Enriching Engagement funding scheme have now been announced, including five projects from across the Medical Sciences Division

Enriching Engagement is a pilot Wellcome-funded grants programme open to Wellcome grant holders and awardees at the University of Oxford, to develop and deliver Public Engagement with Research projects. 

Round 1 awardees are:

  1. Dr. Alex Bullock and Dr. Ellie Williams (Nuffield Department of Medicine) - Development of an SGC Zone within SMASHFest UK: Space Plague escape room project
  2. Prof. Derrick Crook and Dr. Phil Fowler (Nuffield Department of Medicine) - Broadening and deepening public participation in BashTheBug.net online citizen science project
  3. Prof. Deborah Gill and team (Radcliffe Department of Medicine) - Gene Therapy for lung diseases schools engagement
  4. Prof. Patricia Kingori (Nuffield Department of Population Health) in partnership with Eloise King - The Shadow Scholars of Global Health documentary
  5. Prof. Shankar Srinivas and Dr. Tomoko Watanabe (Department of Physiology, Anatomy & Genetics) - Dynamic Origins dance project
  6. Prof. Chris Lintott  and Dr. Helen Spiers (Department of Physics) - Scribbling for Science in Schools: Taking Authentic Research into Schools with the Zooniverse

The next round will open in February 2020. Further details are available on our PER 'Funding' page

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