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In an article for the LSE Impact Blog, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine researcher explains how satellite images can help identify hard-to-reach populations .

Satellite picture of area with houses and forest. On top red squares with numbers

Collecting representative survey data on large populations of people can be a very time-consuming and expensive undertaking. But it doesn’t have to be; in the LSE impact blog, Marco J. Haenssgen (Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine) and Ern Charoenboon explain how they have used freely available satellite images to survey hard-to-reach communities in Thailand and Laos.

Find out more (LSE Impact Blog)

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