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One of the world’s largest efforts to find effective COVID-19 treatments will evaluate the impact of REGN-COV2 on mortality, hospital stays, and the need for ventilation.

pipette dropping a transparent liquid in a petri dish

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and the University of Oxford today announced that RECOVERY (Randomised Evaluation of COVid-19 thERapY), one of the world’s largest randomised clinical trials of potential COVID-19 treatments, will evaluate Regeneron’s investigational anti-viral antibody cocktail, REGN-COV2. The Phase 3 open-label trial in patients hospitalised with COVID-19 will compare the effects of adding REGN-COV2 to the usual standard-of-care versus standard-of-care on its own.

Peter Horby, Professor of Emerging Infectious Diseases and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford and chief investigator of the trial, said, 'We have already discovered that one treatment, dexamethasone, benefits COVID-19 patients, but the death rate remains too high so we must keep searching for others. The RECOVERY trial was specifically designed so that when promising investigational drugs such as REGN-COV2 became available they can be tested quickly. We are looking forward to seeing whether REGN-COV2 is safe and effective in the context of a large-scale randomised clinical trial; this is the only way to be certain about whether it works as a treatment for COVID-19.'

The full story is available on the RECOVERY Trial website

The story is also featured on the University of Oxford website

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