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Evotec SE, a drug discovery and development solutions company, today announced a partnership agreement with the University of Oxford regarding access to biospecimens from the biobank Quality in Organ Donation (QUOD), an initiative of the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences (NDS) at the University of Oxford in close collaboration with the National Health Service Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) organisation in the UK.

Quality in Organ Donation (QUOD) logo

The QUOD biobank is a joint programme by a consortium of UK academic transplant centres and NHSBT. The biobank is funded by NHSBT and the Medical Research Council and provides blood, urine and tissue samples from heart, lung, liver and kidney from consented organ donors for researchers with anonymised integrated medical records. The samples have been collected over several years with QUOD’s primary goal to identify biomarkers, explain mechanisms of injury and repair, and improve organ utilisation and transplantation. 

Under the terms of the partnership, Evotec will investigate at first samples from 1,000 donors of the QUOD biobank using a comprehensive multi-omics analysis (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics). This data will complement Evotec’s existing patient database, generating a greater understanding of disease mechanisms across indications, i.e. cardio-vascular, kidney, and liver diseases. Investigation of diseased versus healthy human biomaterial using a multi-omics approach combined with clinical data will provide extensive knowledge, indispensable for advancement of organ transplantation, drug discovery as well as clinical and biomarker research.

The full story is available on the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences website

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