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Oxford University has won £14 million in new European Research Council (ERC) funding.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Created to support innovative, high-impact research across the academic disciplines, the ERC offer 5-year grants to outstanding scientists and top researchers working in academia across Europe. Since it was founded in 2007 the funding body has awarded close to €12 billion across more than 7,000 grants.

The ERC has announced that it will award a total of 329 consolidator grants as part of its EU Horizon 2020 research programme. The fund is worth a total of €630 million and will have a far-reaching impact on science and beyond. Of this figure, more than €15 million (£14 million) will be given to Oxford University projects, bringing the University’s total amount of ERC funding received this year to nearly €30 million.

The research initiatives chosen cover a range of scientific disciplines across the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences, Medical Sciences, Social Sciences and the Humanities Divisions.

Find out more (University of Oxford website)

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