Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The University of Oxford announced today that it has expanded a strategic collaboration with Janssen Biotech, Inc., one of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson. The agreement was facilitated by Johnson & Johnson Innovation

DNA molecule with futuristic medical technology background

Launched in 2021, the Cartography collaboration aims to develop a cellular map of genes and proteins implicated across a range of immune-mediated inflammatory disorders and characterize pharmacologically relevant therapeutic targets.

Acknowledging the broad impact of immune mechanisms, Oxford is now expanding this ground-breaking work with Janssen to encompass diverse disorders prioritized by the highest unmet need, ranging from immune mediated disorders across several organs, cancer and neurodegeneration.

The three-year expansion adds four new areas: Infectious Disease, Vaccines, Oncology and Neuroscience. These areas will utilize the infrastructure established in the original project to address knowledge gaps in an efficient, multi-faceted approach.

The team of Principal Investigators, Fellows and support roles create a large powerful consortium to tackle the research challenges. Working alongside the current four Postdoctoral Fellows, will be an additional four Fellows focussing on specific disease areas as well as supporting the overall bioinformatics aspects of the programme. This represents a unique opportunity for Fellows and PIs to work on an industrially collaborative project involving multiple departments and disease area strongholds at Janssen all contributing to the large body of data and outcomes.

Lead Oxford investigator for the project, Professor Holm Uhlig said,

'The Cartography projects will allow us to understand cellular networks across multiple diseases and organs and they will establish a research ecosystem to collaborate across disciplines with a group of Janssen and Oxford scientists. Our ultimate aim is to understand tissue adaptation and disease mechanisms that allow us to develop treatments faster and based on cellular mechanisms.’

Chas Bountra, Pro-Vice Chancellor for Innovation and Professor of Translational Medicine said,

‘This has already proved to be an exciting, innovative and impactful collaboration. The team have laid the foundations for accelerating our understanding of human disease pathophysiology at the cellular and molecular level, and offering the potential for discovering new drug targets, establishing new biomarker signatures and creating possibilities for drug repurposing, across a range of inflammatory diseases. I am thrilled this is now being expanded to include other therapeutic areas. My compliments to the team for the progress, and all the leaders for providing the vision and ensuring increased momentum.’

Similar stories

Student Prizes for Biomedical Sciences and Medicine 2021-2022

Congratulations to all our Biomedical Sciences students and Medicine students who have been awarded prizes during the 2021-2022 academic year.

Five ways the pandemic has affected routine medical care

Since the beginning of the pandemic, COVID has infected at least a third of the UK population and is estimated to have factored in the deaths of almost 200,000 people in the UK. But critically, COVID has also had a devastating impact on our healthcare systems. While this was expected, new evidence is beginning to reveal the scope of the issue – in particular the effects for people living with long-term health conditions.

Clinical trials for a malaria vaccine start in Mali and Indonesia

Sanaria Inc. announced that two new Phase 2 trials of its pioneering malaria vaccines have started. The first is in 6- to 10-year-old children living in Bancoumana, Mali, a malarious region of West Africa. The second is in Indonesian soldiers based in Sumatra, Indonesia. The soldiers will be deploying for six to nine months this coming August to an intensely malarious district in eastern Indonesia.

Researchers discover novel form of adaptation in the auditory system

Researchers in the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics (DPAG) have found that the auditory system adapts to the changing acoustics of reverberant environments by temporally shifting the inhibitory tuning of cortical neurons to remove reverberation.

20 minutes of daily exercise can keep teens' doctors away

Teenagers should exercise vigorously for at least 20 minutes per day to reap increased cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), according to a cross-sectional study from the UK led by University of Oxford researchers.

Mechanism of expanding bacteria revealed

A new study published in Nature has identified a potential Achilles heel in the protective layers surrounding Gram-negative bacteria that could aid in the development of next-generation antibiotics.