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The MSD DPhil Day is an annual symposium showcasing the best student work from across the largest division of the University of Oxford. This year was no exception, and on Friday 20th July students from a wide range of scientific backgrounds came together to display their work to a uniquely broad audience.

Thirteen short talks and forty posters were presented and judged by generous volunteer post-docs. Because the overall quality of submissions was very high, it was difficult to pick winners. However, those awarded prizes generally combined rigorous and creative science with excellent communication skills.

In between short talks, a lively panel discussion was chaired by Afsie Sabokbar which focussed largely on the future of scientific publishing, with contributions from past and present editors of Science, The Lancet, and BMJ. We thank our panellists for their impassioned contributions and empathy for students.

The day closed with a keynote speech from Professor Kevin Marsh, senior advisor to the African Academy of Sciences and winner of numerous prizes for his contributions to health in Africa. Professor Marsh used his speech to challenge common misconceptions about the continent. He outlined the rapid socioeconomic change ongoing, and discussed the development of local scientific infrastructure.

The Committee would like to thank all students who attended and especially those who shared their work. Special thanks is also due to Louise Samson, Amanda King, Afsie Sabokbar. 

2018 DPhil day2.jpgBest talks: 1st prize Lisa Simpson (Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, RDM, pictured)

2nd prize Laura Grima (Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences and Experimental Psychology)

Best posters: 1st prize Valentina Gifford (The Kennedy Institute, NDORMS)

2nd prize Rose Hodgson (Centre for Cellular and Molecular Physiology, NDM)

Committee: Caitlin O’Brian Ball, Robert Donat, Deniz Gursul, Ryan Hoyle, Di Hu, Delphine Nzelle Kayem, Peter Liu, Jeff Liu, Jolynne Mokaya, Becky Im, Xanita Saayman, Paolo Spingardi, Sandeep Unwith

 

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