Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

When you visit your doctor, you might assume that the treatment they prescribe has solid evidence to back it up.

The Conversation logo

But you’d be wrong. Only one in ten medical treatments are supported by high-quality evidence, our latest research shows. The analysis, which is published in the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, included 154 Cochrane systematic reviews published between 2015 and 2019. Only 15 (9.9%) had high-quality evidence according to the gold-standard method for determining whether they provide high or low-quality evidence, called GRADE (grading of recommendations, assessment, development and evaluation).

Read the full article on The Conversation website.

Oxford is a subscribing member of The ConversationFind out how you can write for The Conversation.

Similar stories

Misophonia: nearly one in five UK adults have the condition causing extreme reactions to certain sounds

Many of us have sounds that we find to be annoying. But for some people, certain sounds actually trigger extreme reactions.

Any type of hormonal contraceptive may increase risk of breast cancer

An analysis of data by researchers at the Nuffield Department of Population Health’s Cancer Epidemiology Unit has shown that use of progestogen-only hormonal contraceptives is associated with a 20-30% higher risk of breast cancer. The results are published in PLOS Medicine.

Viewing self-harm images on the internet and in social media usually causes harm, according to new review

Clinical researchers have reviewed the international research evidence regarding the impact of viewing images of self-harm on the internet and in social media.

Can humans hibernate?

Illuminating new TEDx Talk from Professor of Sleep Physiology Vladyslav Vyazovskiy

RECOVERY trial team awarded MRC Impact Prize for Outstanding Team Impact

The Medical Research Council Prize Committee has awarded the RECOVERY trial team the MRC Impact Prize 2022 for Outstanding Team Impact.

Multiple Debilitating Pains – New global study shows the experience of Endometriosis is rooted in a person’s genetics

Researchers at the University of Oxford in collaboration with 25 teams across the world have published the largest study to date of the genetic basis of endometriosis.