Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

When you visit your doctor, you might assume that the treatment they prescribe has solid evidence to back it up.

The Conversation logo

But you’d be wrong. Only one in ten medical treatments are supported by high-quality evidence, our latest research shows. The analysis, which is published in the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, included 154 Cochrane systematic reviews published between 2015 and 2019. Only 15 (9.9%) had high-quality evidence according to the gold-standard method for determining whether they provide high or low-quality evidence, called GRADE (grading of recommendations, assessment, development and evaluation).

Read the full article on The Conversation website.

Oxford is a subscribing member of The ConversationFind out how you can write for The Conversation.

Similar stories

New small molecule found to suppress the evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria

Researchers from the Ineos Oxford Institute for antimicrobial research (IOI) and the Department of Pharmacology at Oxford University, have developed a new small molecule that can suppress the evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria and make resistant bacteria more susceptible to antibiotics.