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Researchers from the University of Oxford have constructed a "molecular hopper", capable of moving single strands of DNA through a protein nanotube.

Molecular conveyor belt provides a foundation for nanoscale DNA-processing machines. Image credit: Yujia Qing

The tiny hopper works by making and breaking in sequence simple chemical bonds that attach it to a nanoscale track. This can be turned on, off or reversed by a small electrical potential, which ultimately might make it suitable for use in nanopore DNA sequencing devices.

Find out more (University of Oxford)

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