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The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has today authorised a restart of clinical trials of the ChAdOx1 nCov-2019 Oxford coronavirus vaccine in the USA following the trials restarting in the UK, Brazil, South Africa and Japan.

Vaccine vials on a shelf

On the 6th September, a standard review process triggered a voluntary pause to vaccination across all global trials to allow review of safety data by an independent committee. The FDA has now reached the same conclusion as other international regulators, who have deemed that the trials are safe to resume.

Professor Andrew Pollard, Chief investigator of the Oxford Vaccine Trial at Oxford University said: ‘We are very pleased the FDA has reached the same conclusion as the other regulators of the clinical trial sites around the world, declaring the trial safe to proceed in the USA. This will enable our partners AstraZeneca to begin trialling the vaccine in another 30,000 volunteers, taking our combined large scale, phase 3 clinical trials to 50,000 globally. We will continue to adhere to our rigorous safety processes while moving as quickly as possible so we can start protecting people around the world against this terrible virus as soon as possible.’

The full story is available on the University of Oxford website

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