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The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has today recommended the conditional marketing authorisation of the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 coronavirus vaccine developed by the University of Oxford with its partner AstraZeneca. Distribution will begin across all 27 member states once the decision is ratified by the European Commission.

Nurse reaching for a ChAdOx1 vaccine vial
  • EMA recommends granting conditional marketing authorisation to prevent coronavirus disease in people from 18 years of age
  • Vaccine shown to be highly effective and safe, preventing hospitalisation or death from COVID-19
  • EMA joins regulators from 20 countries in 5 continents worldwide in recommending the use of the vaccine

The EMA has recommended that two standard doses of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 be administered at a four-to 12-week interval in people aged 18 years and older. This dosing regimen was shown in clinical trials to be safe and effective in preventing symptomatic COVID-19, with no severe cases and no hospitalisations more than 14 days after the second dose.

Read the full article on the University of Oxford website

 

Our vaccine work is progressing quickly. To ensure you have the latest information or to find out more about the trial, please visit the Oxford COVID-19 vaccine web hub or visit the COVID-19 trial website.

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