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A new paper published today by the Oxford Martin School calls for ‘open science’ approaches to drug discovery and offers ways forward that would transform how the medical challenges of this century could be addressed more efficiently.

A New Pharmaceutical Commons: Transforming Drug Discovery ’, written by Professor Chas BountraDr Wen Hwa Lee, and Dr Javier Lezaun, highlights the limits of traditional R&D models focussed on secrecy and the protection of Intellectual Property (IP) rights, and offers a set of recommendations for strengthening pre-competitive and open source practices that can accelerate the race for cures to the world’s most harmful diseases.

Read more (Oxford Martin School website)

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