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This pop-up space for 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) supports evidence generation by pooling protocols, tools, guidance, templates, and research standards generated by researchers and networks working on the response to this outbreak. Findings from previous outbreaks, largely obtained during MERS and SARS outbreaks, are also available. We aim to make research faster and easier, and to enable standardised, quality data to be collected and prepared for sharing.

Visit the Coronavirus outbreak knowledge hub

New Novel Coronavirus Resource: standardised case report forms and database, an international resource to facilitate the collection of multi-site standardised clinical data on patients hospitalised with suspected or confirmed infection with 2019-nCoV.

Many groups associated with ERGO are proud to be working on the novel coronavirus outbreak. Just a few of their activities are highlighted below;

A case record form (CRF) designed to enable the collection of standardised clinical data has been made available by the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium (ISARIC). ISARIC is a global federation of clinical research networks, providing a proficient, coordinated, and agile research response to outbreak-prone infectious diseases. ISARIC’s purpose is to prevent illness and deaths from infectious diseases outbreaks. 

ERGO is also part of the Platform for European Preparedness Against (Re-)emerging Epidemics (PREPARE) consortium, an EU funded network for harmonized large-scale clinical research studies of infectious diseases. PREPARE have circulated the standardised collection tool for nCoV among the Multi-centre  EuRopean study of MAjor Infectious Disease Syndromes (MERMAIDS) clinical network which includes more than 50 hospitals and primary care clinics in 12 European countries.

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