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A new clinical research and response network for epidemic infections has been launched in sub-Saharan Africa with the support of a €10 million grant from the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP).

The African coaLition for Epidemic Research, Response and Training (ALERRT) aims to reduce the health and socioeconomic impact of disease outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa. Co-ordinated by Oxford, it will build a sustainable clinical and laboratory research preparedness and response network, with the operational readiness to rapidly implement clinical and laboratory research in support of outbreak control efforts.

ALERRT combines the strengths of 21 leading African and European partner organisations from nine African and four European countries. The partners have established a network of centres and clinics stretching across sub-Saharan Africa that will conduct research on epidemic-prone infectious disease and which will respond quickly to outbreaks.

Find out more (University of Oxford website)

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