Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, funded by Cancer Research UK, has found that the risk of breast cancer recurring persists undiminished for at least 20 years after diagnosis, suggesting that hormonal treatments should continue for even longer to reduce the risk of late recurrence.

Breast cancer study suggests review of treatment length.jpg Shutterstock

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

The Early Breast Cancer Trialists’ Collaborative Group, an international team of investigators based at the University of Oxford, pooled data from over 60,000 women in 88 clinical trials who had been diagnosed with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer between 1976 and 2011, and prescribed anti-estrogen therapy, such as tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor, for 5 years. These women who had no recurrence in the first 5 years, then stopped treatment and their progress was followed for up to 15 further years.

Read more (University of Oxford website)