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Oxford Sciences Innovation (OSI) recently announced the acquisition of its portfolio company, Base Genomics, by US-based early cancer diagnostic leaders, Exact Sciences, for $410m. The partnership will enable Base Genomics to significantly accelerate its clinical and commercial development here in Oxford, potentially unlocking a new era of preventative medicine and improved patient outcomes.

Base Genomics logo

Base Genomics joined the BioEscalator in March 2020 after meeting stringent gateway criteria set by the BioEscalator Management Board, who recognised the company’s high growth potential. In 6 months, they have grown from one lab space to two labs and an office with a third lab soon to be occupied. The BioEscalator has been able to support this rapid expansion by providing flexible space and serviced facilities.

Base Genomics was co-founded in 2018 by two Oxford academics Dr Yibin Liu and Dr Chunxiao Song from the Ludwig Institute and OSI’s Entrepreneur in Residence, Oliver Waterhouse, now CEO at Base. Their aim was to focus on developing a simple blood test to detect early-stage cancers.

The underlying DNA methylation detection technology, TAPS, capable long-read DNA sequencing, was developed at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research by Drs Liu and Song. Base Genomics’ leadership team is completed by Oxford alumna Dr Vincent Smith and Prof Anna Schuh, who is also Director of Molecular Diagnostics at the University’s Department of Oncology.

The full story can be viewed on the BioEscalator website

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