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Enara Bio, a start-up located in the University’s BioEsclator, has announced a strategic collaboration and licensing agreement with Boehringer Ingelheim, worth over €876M (£787M), to lead the discovery and validation of Dark Antigens to target lung and gastrointestinal cancers.

Innovation Building with BioEscalator, EnaraBio and Boehringer Ingelheim logos

Enara Bio, an SV Health backed start-up, was founded in 2016 using technology developed at the Francis Crick Institute, London. The company joined the BioEscalator, Oxford University’s biotech incubator, in 2018 as Ervaxx with five employees and has since developed two proprietary platforms EDAPT™ and Dark Antigen™, rebranded as Enara Bio and grown the team to twenty-seven. Enara Bio has utilised its strong relationship with Oxford academics, including immunopeptidomics expert Dr Nicola Ternette and Vaccitech’s Professor Adrian Hill, both of the Nuffield Department of Medicine, to develop its innovative technologies.  It will now utilise Boehringer’s wealth of big pharma development resources to help drive discoveries further towards the clinic.

The partnership will provide additional funding to advance Dark Antigen research along with further independent validation of Enara’s novel EDAPT™ platform.

We’re excited to be partnered with an innovation-led company that has built considerable expertise in cancer vaccines and immune-oncology - Kevin Pojasek, CEO Enara Bio

Read the full story on the BioEscalator website

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