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There was a 29% reduction in the total amount of sugar sold in soft drinks in the UK between 2015 and 2018, despite an increase in sales of soft drinks by volume of 7%, according to new research from Nuffield Department of Population Health.

Image of sugary drinks

There has been considerable pressure on industry to reduce the sugar content of soft drinks and in April 2018, the British government introduced the Soft Drinks Industry Levy (SDIL) to help tackle childhood obesity. 

Lead researcher Lauren Bandy and her colleagues looked at the nutritional information of a range of soft drinks in the UK, including carbonated drinks, concentrates, juice drinks, 100% juice, energy drinks, sports drinks and bottled water, and combined this with sales data from 2015-2018. 

Read more (Nuffield Department of Population Health website)