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An in-depth look into a collaborative Department of Physiology, Antomy and Genetics (DPAG), Chemistry and Oxford Martin School project pioneering a radical new approach in which the brain is repaired with 3D-printed neural tissues.

Graphical representation of a brain © Gerd Altmann - Pixabay

Brain damage through injury or disease is devastating for the patient, their families and society. Furthermore, the global economic consequences are known to be expanding exponentially; Alzheimer’s Disease alone is projected to affect 92 million people by 2050 when the costs associated with dementia could reach $1.1 trillion a year. So far, existing pharmaceutical and biotherapeutic treatments have been insufficient and clinical trials have repeatedly failed.

Read the full article (DPAG website)