Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Women with bigger waists relative to their hips face a proportionately greater risk of experiencing a heart attack than men who have a similar ‘apple shape’, new research from The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford has found.

2018apple shape2019 more strongly linked to risk of heart attack in women.jpg

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

The study, of nearly 500,000 people who provided data to the UK Biobank, suggests that in both sexes, the waist-to-hip ratio is a better predictor of heart attacks than general obesity, as measured by weight relative to body size using the body mass index (BMI). However, the research suggests women with an ‘apple shape’ are particularly at risk.

Find out more (University of Oxford website)