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Professor Marco Fritzsche has joined the Kennedy Institute as the Principal Investigator of the Biophysical Immunology Laboratory (BPI), as part of a joint appointment with the Rosalind Franklin Institute. His lab is leading the development of a lattice light sheet microscope that will significantly advance the study of live cells.

Biophysical Immunology header © 2020 Fritzsche Laboratory

Marco Fritzsche has a vision. His mission is to untangle the biological significance of mechanobiology on the human immune response in health and disease. In lay terms, what this means is understanding the biological processes taking place at the across scales from single cells via tissues to whole organs level in response to a mechanical signal or change. As an example, how do immune cell sense and respond to inflammation during tissue wound healing? What is allowing the cells to full-fill their function during this immune response integrating information about the mechanical properties of its surroundings and begin to activate a repair function?

Read the full news item on the Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences website

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