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As society battles with an obesity epidemic, new research from the Edwards Group (Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences / Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology & Musculoskeletal Sciences) shows how increased body fat contributes to cancer establishment and progression.

Mouse bone marrow adipocytes stained with bodipy, a fluorescent dye that is taken up by lipid droplets
Mouse bone marrow adipocytes stained with bodipy, a fluorescent dye that is taken up by lipid droplets

Multiple myeloma is an incurable haematological cancer associated with the expansion of abnormal plasma cells within the bone marrow and the development of destructive bone disease. In the last couple of decades, bone marrow fat cells (adipocytes) have emerged as having an important role in bone physiology in health and disease.

Research from Professor Claire Edwards’ team at the Botnar Research Centre and published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, identifies a new mechanism by which myeloma cells alter the bone microenvironment to support disease progression. 

Read more (Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences website)