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University of Oxford researchers have begun recruitment to a study looking at whether chemotherapy medication can reach pancreatic tumours more effectively if encapsulated within a heat-sensitive shell and triggered with focused ultrasound.

Human anatomy with pancreas highlighted

The Phase I PanDox study, which is supported by the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre (BRC), aims to learn if using thermosensitive liposomal doxorubicin and focused ultrasound (FUS) results in enhanced uptake of doxorubicin in pancreatic tumours, compared to doxorubicin alone.

PanDox is being carried out as a multi-disciplinary collaboration between the Oxford University Institute of Biomedical Engineering, the Oncology Clinical Trials Office (OCTO), Oxford University Hospitals (OUH) NHS Foundation Trust and Celsion corporation, the manufacturer of the proprietary heat-activated liposomal encapsulation of doxorubicin ThermoDox used in the study.

The Oxford BRC’s Co-theme Lead for Cancer, Professor Mark Middleton, Head of Department of Oncology at the University of Oxford, and is the chief clinical investigator on the trial. Professor Constantin Coussios, Director of the Institute of Biomedical Engineering, is the lead scientific investigator.

Read the full story on the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre website

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