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People around the country are doing some incredible things to support Oxford’s time-critical coronavirus research, from running multiple marathons to embarking on epic cycle rides, and even releasing music.

Runner's legs © Shutterstock

This brilliant bunch has already raised nearly £50,000 between them, but despite this huge achievement, there’s no sign of them slowing down just yet.

Read some of their stories (Medium website)

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