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University of Oxford-Sichuan University Huaxi Joint Centre for Gastrointestinal Cancer, a new international collaboration led by Prof. David Kerr (Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford) and Prof. Li Yang (Sichuan University) was launched today, Friday 15 May 2020.

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Over the next 5 years this new centre seeks to develop an integrated cancer plan with a focus on gastrointestinal cancer, underpinned by high quality basic, translational and clinical cancer research.

The intention is to develop one team based across two sites, with an operating and governance system that will drive the exchange of ideas, which is crucial to academic development and alleviating the burden that cancer places on societies across the world.

The Centre will seek to build a portfolio of multi-disciplinary teams drawing from both organizations. These teams and their projects will enable scientists and clinicians to learn from each other and apply their expertise for the benefit of cancer patients in both nations. The establishment of a bilateral researcher exchange program will drive the delivery of these.

Read the full story on the Cancer Research UK Oxford Centre website

 

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