Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The pioneering work of members of the University, including research into tackling the Coronavirus pandemic, has been recognised in The Queen's Birthday Honours List.

View of Oxford skyline © Greg Smolonski

The honorands include researchers that have played key roles in leading the University’s response to the Coronavirus pandemic, from the development of new vaccines to the discovery of new drug treatments.

Recognised for their research and contributions to tackling the COVID-19 pandemic:

Sarah Gilbert, Professor of Vaccinology, who becomes a Dame Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (DBE), for services to Science and Public Health. She is the Oxford Project Leader for ChAdOx1 nCoV-19, a vaccine against the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, which is now in use in many countries around the world.

Adrian Hill, Director of the Jenner Institute and Lakshmi Mittal and Family Professor of Vaccinology, who becomes an honorary Knight Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (KBE), for services to Science and Public Health. He has been a key member of the team that designed and developed the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine at the University’s Jenner Institute with the Oxford Vaccine Group.

Peter Horby, Director of the Pandemic Sciences Institute, and Professor of Emerging and Infectious Diseases and Global Health, who becomes a Knight Bachelor for services to Medical Research. He co-leads the UK Randomised Evaluation of COVID-19 therapy (RECOVERY) trial, the largest randomised controlled trial of COVID-19 treatments in the world.

Martin Landray, Deputy Director of the Big Data Institute, and Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology, who becomes a Knight Bachelor for services to Science and Public Health. With Peter Horby, he co-leads the RECOVERY trial, the largest randomised controlled trial of COVID-19 treatments in the world.

Andrew Pollard, Director of the Oxford Vaccine Group, and Professor of Paediatric Infection and Immunity, who becomes a Knight Bachelor for services to Public Health, particularly during the COVID-19 Pandemic. He has led the global clinical trials of the Oxford coronavirus vaccine, with the first doses given on 23 April 2020.

Derrick Crook, Professor of Microbiology in the Nuffield Department of Medicine, is appointed as an Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE) for services to microbiology during the pandemic. Amongst several contributions, Professor Crook led the Oxford University team that standardised testing for new diagnostics kits in the UK. 

Catherine Green, Head of the Nuffield Department of Medicine's Clinical Biomanufacturing Facility and Associate Professor at the Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics, who is appointed as an Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE), for services to Science and Public Health. Her team at the Clinical Biomanufacturing Facility has been an integral part of the University’s development of a ChAdOx1 vectored vaccine against the SARS-CoV-2 virus, in partnership with AstraZeneca.

Teresa Lambe, Associate Professor at the Jenner Institute, who is appointed as an honorary Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE), for services to Science and Public Health. She is one of the Principal Investigators overseeing the University’s Covid-19 vaccine programme.

In addition to those recognised for their work on the COVID-19 pandemic, other memebers of Medical Sciences were also honoured for their research including:

Guy Thwaites, Professor of Infectious Diseases, is appointed a Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) for services to public health and UK/Vietnam relations. Professor Thwaites is Director of the Oxford Clinical Research Unit/Wellcome Programme in Vietnam, which studies emerging viral infections as well as conditions including malaria, tuberculosis and antimicrobial drug resistance. His personal research focuses on severe bacterial infections. 

Christopher Fairburn, Emeritus Professor of Psychiatry, is appointed an officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) for services to Psychological Treatments and the Treatment of Eating Disorders. In 1986, Professor Fairburn founded the Centre for Research on Eating Disorders at Oxford. 

Keith Willett, National Director for Emergency Planning and Incident Response to NHS England and NHS Improvement, Honorary Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Professor of Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery at the University of Oxford, becomes a Knight Bachelor for services to the NHS. As Strategic Incident Director for COVID-19, he has led the NHS England response and ensured the NHS has been fully prepared for the surge in COVID-19 cases.

Congratulations to all our academics recognised in the Queen's birthday honours.

Read the full story on the University of Oxford website

 

Similar stories

Long COVID: vaccination could reduce symptoms, new research suggests

While evidence suggests that people who are vaccinated before they get COVID are less likely to develop long COVID than unvaccinated people, the effectiveness of vaccination on existing long COVID has been less clear.

Com-COV vaccine study to research third dose booster options for 12-to-15-year-olds

Researchers running the University of Oxford-led Com-COV programme have launched a further study of COVID-19 vaccination schedules in young people aged 12 to 15 – with a focus on assessing different options for a third dose booster vaccination.

Population-scale study highlights ongoing risk of COVID-19 in some cancer patients despite vaccination

COVID-19 vaccination is effective in most cancer patients, but the level of protection against COVID-19 infection, hospitalisation and death offered by the vaccine is less than in the general population and vaccine effectiveness wanes more quickly.

New reporting guidelines developed to improve AI in healthcare settings

New reporting guidelines, jointly published in Nature Medicine and the BMJ by Oxford researchers, will ensure that early studies on using Artificial Intelligence (AI) to treat real patients will give researchers the information needed to develop AI systems safely and effectively.

Major boost for Oxford’s mission to counter future pandemic threats

The Moh Family Foundation has given a substantial gift to support the work of Oxford University’s Pandemic Sciences Institute, greatly strengthening its ability to identify and counter future pandemic threats and ensure equitable access to treatments and vaccines around the world.