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The University of Oxford has joined forces with Thermo Fisher Scientific, the world leader in serving science, to ramp up the university’s capacity to deliver COVID-19 testing data.

Covid testing serology machine © John Cairns

The new rapid testing laboratory and jointly developed Thermo Scientific OmnipathTM Combi SARS-CoV-2 IgG ELISA test detects and quantifies antibodies against the coronavirus and increases the University of Oxford’s testing capacity to up to 50,000 tests per day.

Dr. Richard Cornall, Professor of Clinical Medicine and Head of the Nuffield Department of Medicine at the University of Oxford said, 'The collaboration is one of a number of projects that we’ve been co-developing with Thermo Fisher and is particularly important because it secures manufacturing and testing capacity that is important for the UK in the next phase of resolving the pandemic.'

Oxford researchers are already using the new fully automated testing platform to provide weekly UK wide data for the Office of National Statistics as part of the national COVID-19 Infection Survey. In addition, the equipment further enhances Oxford’s capacity to quantify the response to vaccines accurately and on a large scale as part of our ongoing clinical trials of the Oxford coronavirus vaccine to assess vaccine performance.

The full story is available on the University of Oxford website

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