Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The highly effective vaccine developed by the University of Oxford and the Serum Institute of India, leveraging Novavax’s adjuvant is critical to reducing over half a million malaria-related deaths annually.

A shot of vaccine is drawn into a syringe

The R21/Matrix-MTM malaria vaccine developed by the University of Oxford and the Serum Institute of India, leveraging Novavax’s adjuvant technology, has been recommended for use by the World Health Organization (WHO) after meeting required safety, quality and effectiveness standards.

R21/Matrix-M™ malaria vaccine has been recommended for use by the World Health Organization’s Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) and the Malaria Policy Advisory Group (MPAG).

Developed by The University of Oxford and the Serum Institute of India, leveraging Novavax’s adjuvant technology, R21/Matrix-M™ malaria vaccine demonstrates high efficacy with a reassuring safety profile.

The R21/Matrix-M malaria vaccine is an easily deployable vaccine that can be manufactured at mass scale and modest cost, enabling as many as hundreds of millions of doses to be supplied to countries which are suffering a significant malaria burden.

The Serum Institute of India has already established production capacity for 100 million doses per annum, which will be doubled over the next two years.

The World Health Organization’s recommendation today is required for UNICEF to procure and GAVI to purchase the vaccine, paving the way for vaccination of children in populations most at risk.

R21/Matrix-M™ malaria vaccine marks the culmination of 30 years of malaria vaccine research at the University of Oxford's Jenner Institute

Read the full story on the University of Oxford's website.

This story was also discussed in a recent The Conversation podcast

Similar stories

New small molecule found to suppress the evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria

Researchers from the Ineos Oxford Institute for antimicrobial research (IOI) and the Department of Pharmacology at Oxford University, have developed a new small molecule that can suppress the evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria and make resistant bacteria more susceptible to antibiotics.