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Members of the Medical Sciences Division have been recognised in the New Year's Honours list for 2021.

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Professor David Stuart FRS , Professor Eleanor Stride and Dr Gareth Hynes have been recognised in the New Year's Honours list for 2021.

Professor David Stuart FRS, Professor of Structural Biology, has been appointed Knight Bachelor for services to Medical Research and to the Scientific Community.

The knighthood recognises his devotion to understanding the detailed structures of viral proteins, making profound impacts on human and animal health, and pioneering innovative methods in vaccine development and structural biology. Over his career he has delivered ground-breaking insights into the biology of important human viruses such as poliovirus, HIV-1, hepatitis A and B, SARS and Ebola.

Professor Stuart said: ‘I am deeply honoured by this recognition. I have worked to understand the structure and function of pathogenic viruses for many years.

Professor David Stuart has been appointed Knight Bachelor for services to Medical Research and to the Scientific Community

‘This past year has been challenging for many all over the world, and I am amongst the large number of scientists who are trying to apply their knowledge and expertise to help fight this pandemic.

'I am grateful to all those around me, especially in Oxford University and Diamond Light Source, who have worked together tirelessly to understand, in particular, our antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2.’

Professor Eleanor Stride, Statutory Professor of Biomaterials, is appointed OBE for services to engineering.  

Professor Stride said: 'It was the most incredible and wonderful surprise. I still feel quite overwhelmed but also even more motivated to drive forward our research and to continue to work closely with the Royal Academy to support and promote Engineering.'

Professor Stride specialises in the fabrication of nano and microscale devices for targeted drug delivery. She was made a fellow of the ERA Foundation for her contributions to public engagement and promotion of engineering and was nominated as one of the top 100 most influential Women in Engineering in 2016 and 2019.

Professor Stride was also made a fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering in 2017 and an honorary fellow of the IET in 2020.

Dr Gareth Hynes, Specialty Registrar in Respiratory Medicine, is appointed MBE for services to Medical Education during Covid-19.

'This means such a huge amount after the terribly difficult year we've all been through, and I'm incredibly grateful to whoever nominated me for this honour,’ said Dr Hynes. ‘But healthcare is about nothing if not teamwork and the one thing we've seen this year is how people come together when needed, time and again, to get us through this awful pandemic.'

Dr Hynes was involved in organising the regional response to the pandemic. This included pandemic preparation and management, the education of clinicians on Covid-19 and its clinical management, communication and dissemination of information, caring for the physical and emotional wellbeing of colleagues during the response, and looking after patients with Covid-19 on the Respiratory High Dependency Unit.

As well as being a specialist registrar in respiratory medicine at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Dr Hynes is a clinical research fellow at the University of Oxford, co-chair of the Trainee Physician Committee for Health Education England (Oxford Thames Valley Deanery) and co-represents the region on the Royal College of Physicians’ Trainee Committee.

Congratulations also to Professor Dieter HelmProfessor of Economic Policyappointed Knight Bachelor and Professor Christopher Hodges, Professor of Justice Systems, appointed OBE, for services to business and law. 

Read the full story on the University of Oxford website.

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