Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A new analysis from Oxford Population Health has found that pregnant women that are 30 years old or more, overweight, of mixed ethnicity or have gestational diabetes have a greater risk of contracting severe COVID-19, which poses significant risks for both mother and baby.

Woman holding her hands over a pregnancy bump © StockSnap

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, increasing evidence has shown that severe COVID-19 infection in pregnant women significantly raises the risk of adverse outcomes for both mother and baby.

Today, researchers from Oxford Population Health's National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit (NPEU) have published a new analysis of the impacts of COVID-19 infection on pregnancy. In addition, the study identifies several risk factors associated with severe COVID-19 infection in pregnant women, which could help clinicians to identify the most vulnerable women. The results are published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica.

Read the full story on the University of Oxford website

Similar stories

Can humans hibernate?

Illuminating new TEDx Talk from Professor of Sleep Physiology Vladyslav Vyazovskiy

Athena Swan Gold Award success for Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences

The award reflects the Department’s commitment to representation, progression and success for all. It acknowledges the innovative policies and practices developed across the department and the detailed action plans for improvement.

RECOVERY trial team awarded MRC Impact Prize for Outstanding Team Impact

The Medical Research Council Prize Committee has awarded the RECOVERY trial team the MRC Impact Prize 2022 for Outstanding Team Impact.

Professor Sir Chris Whitty brings greater understanding of epidemics to Oxford

Chief Medical Officer of England Professor Sir Chris Whitty KCB FMedSci delivers the Sherrington Prize Lecture: Public Understanding of Science to an audience of Oxford staff and students.

Multiple Debilitating Pains – New global study shows the experience of Endometriosis is rooted in a person’s genetics

Researchers at the University of Oxford in collaboration with 25 teams across the world have published the largest study to date of the genetic basis of endometriosis.

Study shows delaying treatment for localised prostate cancer does not increase mortality risk

Active monitoring of prostate cancer has the same high survival rates after 15 years as radiotherapy or surgery, reports the largest study of its kind.