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The Capture the Fracture Partnership aims to prevent 250 million fractures by 2025 and combat the global public health burden of osteoporosis.

Digital medical illustration. Front x-ray view of the human hip with pain zone in hip highlighted

The University of Oxford has joined a collaboration with the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF), in support of its Capture the Fracture programme. Together with Amgen, and UCB, their goal is to reduce hip and vertebral fractures by 25% by 2025.

The team from Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences (NDORMS); Professor Cyrus Cooper, Dr. Kassim Javaid, and Dr. Rafael Pinedo-Villanueva, bring their collective experience to address the challenge of an estimated 200 million people worldwide suffering from osteoporosis, resulting in an osteoporosis-related fracture every three seconds.

Read more on the NDORMS website

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