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Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin made key contributions to Medical Sciences and was the third woman to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Black and white photograph of Dorothy Crowfood Hodgkin

The New Biochemistry Building on South Parks Road has been renamed the Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin Building in honour of the third woman to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin won the 1964 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for solving the atomic structure of molecules such as penicillin and insulin by using X-ray crystallography. The renaming of the building in Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin’s honour not only commemorates her ground-breaking research contributions to Medical Sciences; it also serves as a reminder of the vital research that takes place in the building today and celebrates her years-long association with the city of Oxford and the University.

The Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin Building is home to the Department of Biochemistry, the Kavli Institute for Nanoscience Discovery, the Oxford Genomics Centre, and a section of the Centre for Medicines Discovery.

Read the full story on the Department of Biochemistry website

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