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The Medical Sciences Division welcomes Steve Bates, CEO of the UK Bioindustry Association, as a Royal Society Entrepreneur in Residence. Steve Bates will be working very closely with our Translational Research Office and key teams across the University of Oxford's innovation ecosystem.

Steve Bates alongside the Royal Society logo

Steve will lead an initiative to capture how academic institutions can deliver lifesaving technologies, incorporating learnings from the Covid era. In the recent years, we have seen the Oxford – Astra Zeneca Covid 19 vaccine, and other technologies such as OxVent, being developed and delivered to patients in a record time of one year, which would have been unimaginable prior to the Covid times.

Steve will work with academic teams and organisations to learn from the Covid response and investigate how we apply these learnings for future endeavours, facilitating a sustainable and perennial ‘fast-track route to innovation’ in academic organisations.  

In his role, Steve will:

  • Investigate and understand which potential organisational barriers exists but could be bypassed to respond rapidly to unmet needs
  • Identify measures and implementable changes in procedures across the university standard business practices.  
  • Ensure that the cultural and procedural shockwaves from the Covid19 programmes impacts organisations to be better equipped to support, facilitate, and implement entrepreneurial success.  

Find out more about the Entrepreneur in Residence scheme

About Steve Bates

Steve Bates has been the CEO of the UK Bioindustry Association since 2012, representing the UK Life Sciences Industry, as it developed into a key global innovation cluster for the biotechnology industry. Steve sits on the UK Government’s Life Sciences Council (alongside Professor Sir John Bell) and Life Sciences Industrial Strategy Implementation Board, and chairs the Global International Council of Biotech Associations. He worked on advocating for the UKRI Biomedical Catalyst scheme, supporting translational research and bridging the gap between early stage research and industry in the U.K. In 2020, Steve Bates was part of the UK Government Covid19 Vaccine Taskforce Steering Group, supporting the delivery of the UK vaccine through the pandemic. He was awarded an OBE for services to innovation in 2017 and made a fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences in 2021.

About the Royal Society Entrepreneur in Residence (EiR) Scheme

The Royal Society Entrepreneur in Residence (EiR) scheme, part of the Science, Industry and Translation programme, aims to increase the knowledge and awareness in UK universities of cutting edge industrial science, research and innovation. The successful applicants are funded to spend 20% of their time over two years with their host university and collaborators, sharing their experiences to help mentor and support students and academics. The scheme has now funded 49 placements in 29 universities across the UK since its inception in 2018.

Read more on the Royal Society website.

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