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Researchers from the Medical Sciences Division will be running activities on topics from genetic editing to chocolate.

IF Oxford is an annual science and ideas festival taking place in locations across the city. It offers a variety of events, workshops and talks to explore the latest scientific research with audiences of all ages, and creates an opportunity for thousands of face-to-face interactions between Festival visitors, researchers and innovators.This year's festival runs from 12- 22 October, and researchers from the Medical Sciences Division will be out in force!

A huge variety of events co-ordinated by Oxford Neuroscience (from departments including Experimental Psychology, Pharmacology, Physiology Anatomy and Genetics, Psychiatry and the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences) will offer visitors the opportunity to explore how the brain controls everything from our muscles to our breathing, and the techniques researchers use to find out more about it. Also don't miss 'The Consciousness Field' an interactive art installation that offers a journey through the mammalian brain. 

Another art exhibition from Meg Rahaim, the artist in residence at the Wellcome Centre For Human Genetics in Oxford for the 2017/18 academic year, will also be open to the public for the duration of the festival, and offers an insight into human genetics through the mediums of printing and crochet - find out more. 

Oxfordshire Science Festival 4© NDM Strategic

Hands on activities at a previous Festival 

Researchers from the Radcliffe Department of Medicine will be exploring genome editing, genetic sequencing, and the importance of blood through hands-on activities, talks, and virtual reality, while scientists from the Department of Biochemistry will demonstrate the wonderful world of crystals - which make chocolate taste great, and can help us to understand human diseases. Further activities run by researchers from the Nuffield Department of Medicine, NDORMS, Department of Pharmacology, Department of Paediatrics, and Department of Surgical Sciences will also offer insights into the Medical Research done at the University. 

There are hundreds more activities taking place over these ten days, so make sure you check out the IF Oxford website for a full programme. You can also find out more about how the Medical Sciences Division engages with the public here

 

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