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The Moh Family Foundation has given a substantial gift to support the work of Oxford University’s Pandemic Sciences Institute, greatly strengthening its ability to identify and counter future pandemic threats and ensure equitable access to treatments and vaccines around the world.

Vaccine research being undertaken in an Oxford medical sciences laboratory © John Cairns / Oxford University

The generous donation will drive forward several core research strands, provide support for doctoral students and secure the future of a number of academic leadership posts at the institute, which was established in 2021 to consolidate Oxford’s world-leading pandemic science activity.

Led by Professor Sir Peter Horby, the Pandemic Sciences Institute (PSI) seeks to unite disciplines and sectors in order to build agile, equitable partnerships that can tackle complex problems and respond to pandemic threats at any time. To do this, the institute harnesses the strong global collaborations that Oxford has developed over more than forty years, as well as those built in record time between academia, industry and public health bodies during the coronavirus pandemic.

It was the ‘total alignment of values and interests’ that first drew the foundation’s attention to the PSI, says CEO Peggy Moh. ‘There are two tracks in our mission to empower individuals to reach their full potential: education and healthcare. With work in the US, China and now Southeast Asia, we take a global perspective on things. And when we saw how the institute is designed, with global consideration, collaboration and an emphasis in non-profit making, we thought it a very admirable organisation that we could foresee supporting.’

The Moh Family Foundation was established by furniture industry entrepreneur Laurence Moh and his wife Celia, with the aim of enabling others to benefit from the transformative power of education. Today the foundation is led by the couple’s son and daughter-in-law, Michael and Peggy, who carry forward their vision by prioritising integrity, entrepreneurship, innovation and investment in people.

Read the full story on the University of Oxford's Development Office website

The story is also featured on the University of Oxford website

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