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The key to swift treatments to cure the pain of rheumatoid arthritis has been found in the joints of people with the condition who are in long-term remission.

3D illustration of a person holding their knee. Red mono tone highlight at knee indicating joint pain

The study, published in Nature Medicine found that people with arthritis in long-term remission had a difference in cell function which could settle inflammation and 'teach' nearby cells to repair the joint.

Although treatment for rheumatoid arthritis has improved, some people with the condition do not respond well with many having unpredictable 'flare-ups' of the disease. Scientists now hope that by harnessing the benefit of these 'resolving' cells it could lead to new and more effective treatments.

The full story is available on the Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology & Musculoskeletal Sciences website

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