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In this Centenary year of the ending of the First World War, the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics remembers two of its former students who were awarded the highest and most prestigious award of the British honours system - the Victoria Cross.

Noel Godfrey Chavasse (left) and George Allan Maling (right)

Noel Godfrey Chavasse (9 November 1884 – 4 August 1917) studied Physiology at Oxford from 1904 – 1909, where he joined the University’s Officers’ Training Corps Medical Unit, before graduating with a first class degree. George Allan Maling (6 October 1888 – 9 July 1929) studied in the Physiology Laboratory at Oxford from 1909 – 1911 as part of his Natural Sciences degree, which he graduated with honours.

You can read more about their lives and actions in the First World War on the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics website. 

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