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Many of us have no idea whether or not our period is “normal”. It’s no wonder, since not only is everyone different, but the stigma still keeps many of us from asking questions or discussing what we go through every month with friends and family.

But there is such as thing as bleeding too much. In fact, around a quarter of women experience a clinical condition known as menorrhagia – also called heavy menstrual bleeding. This is when your period is abnormally heavy or prolonged. Here’s what you need to know about the condition.

Read the full article on The Conversation website, written by Associate Professor Suzannah Williams and DPhil student Tomi Adeniran (Nuffield Department of Women's and Reproductive Health).

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