Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The International Severe Acute Respiratory and emerging Infection Consortium (ISARIC), based at Oxford University, in collaboration with Dr Janet Scott, of the MRC-University of Glasgow’s Centre for Virus Research, has launched a longitudinal observational study to measure prevalence and risk factors of long-term health and psychosocial consequences of COVID-19. The researchers are inviting hospitals and healthcare sites worldwide to join this new study.

Doctors wearing full PPE in a hospital setting

The ISARIC Global COVID-19 follow-up working group is co-led by Dr Louise Sigfrid, of the Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, University of Oxford. The study protocol and associated patient survey has been developed in collaboration with clinicians and research colleagues from Brazil, Canada, Colombia, France, Ghana, Italy, Norway, Pakistan, Russia, Sierra Leone and a wide range of experts in infectious diseases, rheumatology, neurology, intensive care, oncology, public health, psychology and rehabilitation. The patient survey has been designed to assess long-term health and psychosocial consequences of COVID-19 at serial intervals for up to three to five years, depending on resources.

Louise Sigfrid (ISARIC/ University of Oxford) said, 'Currently, very little is known about possible clinical and psychosocial sequelae that may persist in patients after recovering from acute COVID-19. A recent study from Italy of 143 patients after hospitalisation with COVID-19, showed that 87% had at least one ongoing symptom after 60 days. It will be interesting to see what results come from larger groups of patients from different populations.'

The full story is available on the University of Oxford website

Similar stories

New reporting guidelines developed to improve AI in healthcare settings

New reporting guidelines, jointly published in Nature Medicine and the BMJ by Oxford researchers, will ensure that early studies on using Artificial Intelligence (AI) to treat real patients will give researchers the information needed to develop AI systems safely and effectively.

Major boost for Oxford’s mission to counter future pandemic threats

The Moh Family Foundation has given a substantial gift to support the work of Oxford University’s Pandemic Sciences Institute, greatly strengthening its ability to identify and counter future pandemic threats and ensure equitable access to treatments and vaccines around the world.

Three NHSBT research units launch at University of Oxford

The NIHR has awarded three new Blood and Transplant Research Units (BTRUs) to the University of Oxford.

Fourth COVID-19 vaccine dose provides stronger immunity boost than third dose, shows UK study

COVID-19 vaccines given as fourth doses in the UK offer excellent boosting immunity protection, according to the latest results from a nationwide NIHR-supported study.

COVID-19’s high blood clot risk

A recent study of patient health records found that around 1 in 100 people with COVID-19 had a venal or arterial thrombosis, with rates higher still among males, and particularly for those hospitalised.

Medical Sciences Division receives REF 2021 results

Today the UK Funding Bodies have published the outcomes of the recent national research assessment exercise, the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2021. REF is the UK-wide assessment of research in universities, and provides an expert evaluation of the quality of the research outputs, impact and environment at subject level in each university.